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Bayana Bayana lose World Cup warm up to USA in California

They open the World Cup in Group F against Thailand, Chile and Sweden.

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Bayana Bayana lose Word Cup warmup to USA in California
Photo credit: Bayana Bayana / Twitter

South Africa Women’s football team, Bayana Bayana on Sunday lost their World Cup tune up game against the USA by 3-0.

Samantha Mewis scored twice, and Carli Lloyd added a late goal as the United States dominated the game at the Levi’s Stadium in Santa Clara, California.

The victory launched the Americans’ “Send-Off Series” of matches as they prepare to defend their title at the World Cup in France, which begins on June 7.

The United States next face New Zealand on Thursday in St. Louis and later face Mexico on May 26 in Harrison, New Jersey before departing for France.

They open the World Cup in Group F against Thailand, Chile and Sweden.

Desiree Ellis’ Bayana Bayana side are in Group B at this year’s World Cup, and will open their campaign against Spain on the June 8.

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Southern Africa

South Africa’s new TB regimen cures drug-resistant cases

The new treatment which cures highly drug-resistant strains of tuberculosis will drastically shorten the treatment period

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South Africa's new TB regimen cures drug-resistant cases
A caretaker inspects bandages in the activity room of Ward 16, where the drug-resistant tuberculosis patients are housed and treated at the Sizwe Tropical Diseases Hospital in Johannesburg, South Africa. - A new treatment was approved on August 14, 2019 by the US Food and Drug Administration which cures highly drug-resistant strains of tuberculosis and drastically shorten the treatment period. (Photo by Michele Spatari / AFP)

Four years ago, South African fashion designer Innocent Molefe, 38, was diagnosed with tuberculosis. A year ago, it developed into multi-drug resistant strain requiring painful injections and heaps of pills.

Three months after the first round of treatment, he relapsed and started a second round. At the end of it, he still wasn’t cured.

Thanks to a new treatment – approved Wednesday by the US Food and Drug Administration – he is now cleared of the disease, has bounced back to work and has even resumed night-clubbing, something he has stopped four years ago.

“I was willing to beat TB and I’m living proof. I can move around… I can still go clubbing till the early hours,” said the dreadlocked designer at his home in Soweto township.

READ: South Africa buries 46 unidentified and unclaimed corpses

The announcement was especially welcomed in South Africa, one of the countries with the highest number of TB cases. Of the more than 1.6 million TB deaths recorded every year, more than 75,000 are in South Africa alone. In 2017, South Africa recorded more than 322,000 active TB cases.

South Africa's new TB regimen cures drug-resistant cases
TB patients rest in the garden of Ward 16, where the drug-resistant tuberculosis patients are housed and treated at the Sizwe Tropical Diseases Hospital in Johannesburg, South Africa.(Photo by Michele Spatari / AFP)

The new treatment which cures highly drug-resistant strains of tuberculosis will drastically shorten the treatment period.

The three-drug regimen consists of bedaquiline, pretomanid and linezolid – collectively known as the BPaL regimen.

Pretomanid is the novel compound developed by the New York-based non-profit organisation TB Alliance and which received the FDA greenlight Wednesday.

The treatment regimen was trialled at three sites in South Africa involving 109 patients and achieved a 90 per cent success rate after six months of treatment and six months of post-treatment follow-ups.

‘Groundbreaking treatment’-

With the treatment involving five pills of the three drugs daily taken over just six months – it makes easier to administer.

READ: South Africa’s adoption crisis blown open by baby box

This compares to between 30 and 40 drugs that multiple-drug resistant TB patients take each day for up to two years.

“Usually and in many places in the world, the treatment for (multiple) … drug-resistant TB would take anything between 18 to 24 months,” said Pauline Howell, principal investigator of the clinical trial at Sizwe Tropical Disease Hospital in Johannesburg.

“This still includes daily injections for six months, which are extremely painful,” Howell said, adding that taking only five pills would make a huge difference.

The FDA approval represents a victory for those suffering from highly drug-resistant forms of the world’s deadliest infectious disease, said Mel Spigelman, president and CEO of TB Alliance. 

South Africa's new TB regimen cures drug-resistant cases
TB patients do painting activities with a caretaker in the garden of Ward 16, where the drug-resistant tuberculosis patients are housed and treated at the Sizwe Tropical Diseases Hospital in Johannesburg, South Africa. (Photo by Michele Spatari / AFP)

Last year, there were more than half a million drug-resistant TB cases in the world.

A chronic lung disease which is preventable and largely treatable if diagnosed in time, tuberculosis is the top infectious killer, causing over 1.6 million deaths each year.

More than 10 million cases are recorded every year. The disease has worsened as it has become increasingly resistant to available medicines.

TB Alliance started designing the trial in 2014.

“This is really groundbreaking result we have here,” said Folu Olugbosi, clinical director and head of the South African office of TB Alliance.

Patients are moving from a “truckload of pills” to cure the resistant strain with just three drugs and in just six months, Olugbosi said.

READ: Poo Power: How dung biodigester is supercharging farming in Kenya

At the Sizwe hospital northeast of Johannesburg, a patient named Nxumalo arrived from Katlehong township for his regular post-treatment check-up to make sure he is still in the clear.

“With the old regimen, I would vomit,” said the 23-year-old unemployed man. “But with the one for research, it’s easier to take than 24 tablets.”

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French-Lebanese billionaire in $2 billion debt scandal in Mozambique

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French-Lebanese billionaire sued in $2 billion debt scandal in Mozambique
The Lebanese Iskandar Safa, French businessman and CEO of the Privinvest Group. Photo credit: AFP

Mozambique has started legal action against a French-Lebanese billionaire, Iskandar Safa, whose shipbuilding company is at the heart of a $2 billion debt scandal, officials said Friday.

A source at the attorney general’s office, in an emailed reply to AFP, confirmed “a case is ongoing” without giving details.

In London, an official at the High Court commercial division told AFP the Mozambican government had filed proceedings there against Safa.

The papers were submitted on July 31 and no date has been set yet for the hearing, the source said.

Safa is CEO of a giant Abu-Dhabi based shipbuilding company, Privinvest, which signed contracts with Mozambique state companies to supply ships and national maritime security. 

The government’s legal moves came after testimony in a New York court last month by a former Credit Suisse banker, Andrew Pearse.

Safa, he said, had wired him “millions of dollars in unlawful kickbacks from loan proceeds and illegal payments” for help in securing loans from the bank.

Safa has denied any wrongdoing and according to his lawyer Jacqueline Laffont, he “strongly” disputes Pearse’s “baseless statements, obtained after several months of pressure from the US Department of Justice”.

The scandal is rooted in loans of $2 billion (1.8 billion euros), undertaken by the government between 2013 and 2015, to buy a tuna-fishing fleet and surveillance ships.

The government admitted it borrowed the money secretly, forcing international donors to suspend aid.

An independent audit found that a quarter of the loans had been unaccounted for, and another $750 million, used to buy equipment, had been over-invoiced.

‘Denies any wrongdoing’

The United States alleges at least $200 million was spent on bribes and kickbacks.

Several people have been arrested both in Mozambique and abroad.

They include Mozambique’s ex-finance minister, Manuel Chang, who is said to have received $12 million for allegedly signing off on debt guarantees.

Chang was arrested in South Africa last year on a US extradition request.

In an ongoing tussle over where he could stand trial, the Mozambican government this week said it would fight attempts to extradite him to the US after the South African government halted plans to send the minister to his home country.

When the hidden debt was revealed, Mozambique in the middle of a serious financial crisis.

The US Department of Justice has accused three former Credit Suisse workers of helping to create $2 billion in maritime projects as a front for the scam.

They were arrested in London in early January. In May one of them pleaded guilty to conspiracy to launder funds over the case.

In emailed response for comment, Privinvest spokesman on the Mozambique case, Jeffrey Birnbaum, said the businessman did nothing wrong.

“Mr. Safa cannot comment on why the Mozambique government has sought to institute proceedings against him personally” until he has seen details of the claim. 

“He does not accept that the English Court has jurisdiction over him, and in any event, denies any wrongdoing,” Birnbaum said. 

Birnbaum said Privinvest delivered on its contractual commitments and took “extraordinary steps to help make the Mozambique projects succeed”, but the Mozambican entities “failed to hold up their end of the agreements”.

Privinvest had earlier this year instituted proceedings against the Mozambique government, which included “arbitration to recover losses and damages arising from breach of contract,” the spokesman said. 

Safa’s lawyer Laffont told AFP in France that the jurisdiction of the London court is contested, adding neither him nor his company is facing criminal prosecution either in the US or in Mozambique.  

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Zimbabwe arrests tourism minister over alleged pension fund graft

Prisca Mupfumira was fired as social welfare minister by ex-president Robert Mugabe weeks before a military-led coup that toppled him

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Zimbabwe arrests tourism minister over alleged pension fund graft
Zimbabwean Minister of Environment and Tourism, Prisca Mupfumira. (File photo)

Zimbabwe’s anti-corruption agency said Thursday it had detained Environment and Tourism Minister Prisca Mupfumira, the first high-profile arrest since it was overhauled by President Emmerson Mnangagwa this month. 

According to state-owned daily, The Herald, the minister is being held over the alleged disappearance of millions of dollars at the country’s pension fund when she was social welfare minister.

The Zimbabwe Anti-Corruption Commission (ZACC) said in a tweet:

“We can confirm that the Minister of Tourism is currently in our custody for questioning and possible due processes”.

Mupfumira was fired as social welfare minister by ex-president Robert Mugabe weeks before a military-led coup that toppled the long-time ruler in November 2017.

She was re-appointed after the coup, in a new portfolio.

Mupfumira is the first sitting minister of the ruling ZANU-PF party to be arrested for graft under Mnangagwa’s new administration. 

The ZACC was created during the Mugabe era but was criticised for being ineffective. Mnangagwa appointed a new team on July 15.

Critics had expressed doubts over the new commission because it was led by High Court Judge Loice Matanda-Moyo, the wife of army general Sibusiso Moyo who was involved in the coup that ousted Mugabe and is now foreign minister.

Manangagwa has identified endemic corruption as a major contributor to the country’s economic woes and vowed to root it out.

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